Tag Archives: organizational skills

10 Things I Wish I Had Done Before I Was Diagnosed With Cancer

I’m convinced that nothing can fully prepare a person for the impact of a cancer diagnosis, but there are still things that I wish I had done before cancer became a part of my life. As a five-year cancer survivor I now have the wisdom of hindsight, so I’ve chosen to share my definitive list of what I wish I had accomplished when I was still healthy.

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Have a Plan Regarding My Work and Income

It’s important to have a strategy in the event that you suddenly become unable to work due to illness or disability. Unfortunately I was unprepared and learned this lesson the hard way. If you’re a self-employed individual, such as a freelancer or independent contractor, you may be especially vulnerable if circumstances ever render you unable to work for the long-term.

Go Out and Experience New Things

When I was still in good health, I made too many excuses about why I couldn’t go out to events or experience new things. I’m basically an introvert and prefer to stay in, it’s for couples only, I can’t afford it, the transportation and commute are too much of a hassle were some of the issues I’d focus on when ruling out gatherings or events.

Be More Physically Active

I regret not going for long walks or spending more time outdoors in the years leading up to my cancer diagnosis. Science has essentially proven that people who are active have an advantage compared to those who don’t exercise. Active individuals tend to live longer, healthier lives than their sedentary counterparts.

Purchase a Disability Insurance Plan

This is something I really regret not taking care of and I strongly urge anyone without this type of insurance to look into a plan. The only alternative to private insurance if you suddenly become chronically ill or disabled is most often government assistance.

Listen to My Body

Ovarian cancer is sometimes called the “silent killer” because its symptoms are often subtle or mimic other less serious illnesses. It’s important to know what is normal for your body and to be alert to any changes that might indicate a problem. I wish I had been more in tune with my body and more persistent with my doctors.

Develop a Support Network

When I was diagnosed with cancer I quickly realized that my social support network is very small. Specifically, I’m single, come from a small family of origin and have few close friends. I understand that some of this isn’t under my control, but I definitely wish I had been more diligent about building a network when I was still healthy.

Pay More Attention to My Relationships

If you have conflicts in your family relationships or have simply drifted apart, I suggest you reach out to repair whatever damage might have occurred over the years. Once you are diagnosed with a chronic illness you suddenly comprehend the value of having strong bonds with family members, including your parents, spouse, siblings and children.

Be Prepared For People’s Reactions

When people learned of my cancer diagnosis their reactions sometimes caused me resentment, frustration or anger. They meant well, but I could have been more prepared for their sometimes inappropriate remarks and gestures. Many individuals are misinformed about the scientific facts surrounding cancer or don’t know how to properly reach out to a friend who has been diagnosed with the disease.

Catch Up on Things I’ve Let Slide

We all have a tendency to procrastinate or push tasks and projects to the back burner. When I became ill I suddenly realized how many things were left undone and how many loose ends I should have tied up. If you have been meaning to buy some essential new pieces for your wardrobe, need new glasses or need to get your car or computer serviced, do it now!

Establish an Outlet For Anger and Grief

The universal emotions for nearly all cancer patients are anger and grief—intense anger that can border on rage and a grief that can feel like a bottomless well of despair. To maintain your emotional health you’ll need an outlet for these feelings. It might be a friend, therapist or support group, but it’s important to have someone that you can confide in without fear of judgment

 

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Getting Organized: Learning to Manage Your Cancer Journey

 

IMG_0117When my gynecologist informed me that I had cancer almost three and half years ago the last thing on my mind was trying to manage the absolute chaos that my life had suddenly become. First, I was numb and in shock to learn that I had gynecological cancer at a fairly advanced stage. Once the dust had settled I found myself experiencing intense anger and fear, I was actually astonished to learn that emotions so strong existed. My life seemed to be spinning violently out of control and there appeared to be little I could do to stop this process or to regain a sense of stability. It was tempting to sit back and let things happen to me, and to believe that events were completely beyond my influence.

Despite my anxiety, I immediately realized that successful cancer treatment would require me to be an active participant, I would need to schedule and attend literally dozens of medical appointments. At the same time I would have to deal with the bureaucracy of the health-care system on an almost daily basis. Of course, I knew I could depend on family members to assist me when I was hospitalized or completely exhausted. But by and large I established that it was my cancer, my body and my complex journey to navigate.

Following my diagnosis I was often overwhelmed with the countless tasks that I was required to perform and with the hurried pace at which things were happening, but I’ve gradually devised my own system that enables me to be more organized. Over time I’ve learned to confront the practical life changes associated with cancer treatment, I’m now able to approach them with more efficiency and less hassle.

Keeping a Record of Your Treatment on Paper

 

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I strongly recommend keeping a personal record of your cancer treatment, including surgeries that are performed and any chemotherapy or radiotherapy that is administered. I have chosen to use a binder and I suggest the following other essential stationery supplies:

1. Page protectors (single page and multipage)
2. A hole punch
3. A stapler

I’ve used a combination of chronological order and straightforward categories to organize my documents. In case you’re wondering what needs to be in your cancer treatment diary, here is some of the key information that I’ve chosen to include in mine:

  • Basic documentation concerning my hospitalizations and surgeries
  • Complete pathology reports
  • A timetable of appointments, the specific drugs that I was given and other essential details regarding my chemotherapy
  • Physician progress notes summarizing my appointments at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre outpatient clinic

Using a Computer to Bring Your Journey Together

 

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Now that personal computers are firmly ingrained in our culture and nearly everyone is computer literate you’ll want to take advantage of this technology to make your cancer journey easier and more organized. As with traditional filing, you’ll require an organized system for letters, personal notes, essays and other word processing files. It’s best to create a classification system that makes sense to you and that allows you to locate files and documents quickly on your computer. Of course the Internet is invaluable for cancer patients wishing to learn more about their disease, but it’s essential to ascertain the difference between reliable or accredited sites and those that contain inaccurate, and sometimes even dangerous, information.

Some cancer patients have the advantage of accessing their official medical records online. Those of us being treated for cancer in Alberta unfortunately do not have access to these types of databases; my hope is that we might in the near future. I was excited to learn that there are plans to start an online portal this year that will give Albertan’s access to their prescriptions. Meanwhile, the intention is to add other medical information to the online system over time. In the interim I have to be content with requesting information from my medical records directly from the Tom Baker Centre and making sure each request is in writing. This can be a time consuming and tedious process, but it’s my judgment that the aggravation is worth it.

Ultimately the completeness or comprehensiveness of your medical information and the ease with which you can obtain medical records will vary depending on where in Canada you are receiving treatment. There is little doubt that receiving your cancer treatment in the United States or in a private health-care system may offer some advantages in terms of obtaining complete documentation. There is considerable bureaucracy and more overall effort involved by patients in the public system that I am a part of in Calgary, Alberta. We have to advocate a great deal for ourselves in terms of getting the information we need, and such pursuits can be difficult for a cancer patient when they are receiving chemotherapy or other active treatment. Personally I admit my medical appointments and diagnostic tests have slowed down substantially now that I’m in remission.

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