Poetic Discourse

National Poetry Month, which takes place each April, is a celebration of poetry introduced in 1996. The event is spearheaded by the Academy of American Poets and originated on the steps of a post office in New York City. There, the story goes, Academy staff members handed out copies of T.S. Eliot’s poem, “The Waste Land,” which begins, “April is the cruellest month…” to individuals waiting in line to mail their tax returns.

Those of you who follow The Teal Diaries are aware that I write prose, however I’ve been inspired during my cancer treatments to pen a small collection of poetry. Here I’ve chosen to share two of my short poems. My compositions Patient’s Lab Results and A Visit to the Emergency Room both explore the life altering power of a cancer diagnosis.

 

Patient’s Lab Results

The sun is preparing to set on a late autumn afternoon,
its rays hold me together as I fall asleep dreaming of
my immaculate incision. Scarcely a week since my surgery.
I almost laugh to think I was such a novice.
Such a common virgin.

I pass through sliding doors to a point of no return.
Then I enter a vacant waiting room,
a place that is sinister, foreboding.
How many women have waited in these chairs?
How many innocent lives transformed?

“The ultrasound shows a growth on your ovary.”
“You need surgery to remove your uterus and right ovary.”
“You have cancer.”

Ultimately, he arrives, seeming anxious to print the pages.
“Here, this is for you.”
His words turn to ice as he offers me the pathology report.
Warmth as he grasps my hand, lending some reassurance.

My world dissolves as I take ownership of a disease.
The rapidly dividing cells, the cancerous tumors,
the abhorrent malignancy.

“Adenocarcinoma of the endometrium”
“The uterine cavity is completely filled with light tan neoplasm.”
“Right ovary with synchronous endometroid adenocarcinoma”

 

Immunotherapy one

 

A Visit to the Emergency Room

Riding unending waves of pain and nausea,
I take a secret pride in my endurance.
The sign over the door says MINOR EMERGENCIES.
Should I draw attention to this irony?

The young nurses seem aloof, peering out from
behind their curtain. I sense that we are to be
endured until morning comes. Around me
are the homeless, the destitute the addicted.

The fluorescent lights have been turned low,
casting a pale greenish tinge across the room.
Beeping monitors and moaning
patients provide the soundtrack.

I wonder if these souls feel entirely unaided,
abandoned, alone amid the chaos.
Each of us is fighting a singular
and solitary battle.

A torrent of frustration, then drowning I panic.
I want to scream that I’m a cancer patient
and my bowels are blocked.
I long for them to have evidence.
When will they be convinced?
I’m a bloated organ about to rupture.

The pre-dawn hours break like a fever
and I emerge from my delirium.
The kind eyes of the doctor and the
contrite look on the nurse’s face.

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The Etiquette of Cancer

I’ve been living with cancer for six years now, having been through three abdominal cancer surgeries, five rounds of chemotherapy as well as countless scans and procedures, I’ve become deeply aware of the “etiquette of cancer.” Or the lack thereof. Etiquette has everything to do with situation, context, timing, individuals and circumstances—cancer etiquette is the same. I can’t offer any concrete rules, only suggestions and advice about how to communicate when the subject you’re dealing with is cancer. Perhaps most importantly you should be authentic and true to your relationship. Essentially the person hasn’t changed and wants to be treated as you always have. He or she is still that special someone in your life, with cancer, for the time being.

teacup-etiqette

 

Respect the Person With Cancer’s Privacy

One important area of etiquette that was sometimes breached during my diagnosis and treatment was respect for my privacy as a cancer patient. Of course, I won’t name people specifically, but there were one or two family acquaintances who took it upon themselves to spread the news of my illness. Please don’t share cancer information unless you know you have permission from the individual. Don’t use telephone calls, emails, social media, newsletters or bulletins to comment about a person without their specific consent. This rule is especially important when it comes to something as intensely personal as one’s health or a cancer diagnosis.

 

Practice the “Ring Theory” of Kvetching

Recently a technique has gained attention for coping with a major life crisis, such as a serious illness.  It’s called the ring theory of kvetching, so named by the psychologist Susan Silk, writing in the LA Times in 2013. Silk drew on her experiences as a breast cancer patient. When she declined one colleague’s visit, pleading exhaustion, she was told, “This isn’t just about you.” “It’s not?” she wondered. “My breast cancer is not about me? It’s about you?” The main principle of the ring theory is that support, caring, comfort FLOWS IN. Kvetching, venting, complaining, requests for empathy, all of this only FLOWS OUT. The person or people with the illness, trauma, or other enormously challenging life situation — they get to complain outwardly to their first circle of support. The first circle of support does NOT vent — about the challenges, the loss of sleep, the emotional toll, etc. — to the person or people at the centre of the trauma.

 

ring-theory-graphic1

 

Don’t Offer Treatment Advice

When I was undergoing treatment, I can remember getting angry when people other than my cancer care team would try to give me medical information. “If I want information regarding cancer or cancer treatment, I’ll ask for it,” I thought. In the months following my cancer diagnosis I was inundated with information and advice from my medical team. Consequently, the articles from newspapers, magazines or online publications that I received from other people were annoying. For the most part these pieces were irrelevant and unnecessary. Also be careful when presenting teas, potions or homeopathic remedies to treat cancer. When some individuals gave me a gift basket with ginger and dandelion root, I didn’t bother to explain to them that these nutrients are specifically mentioned on a list oncologists give to their patients. Ginger and dandelion root do not combine well with many traditional chemotherapy drugs, and therefore patients should refrain from using them during active treatment.

 

Don’t Minimize the Diagnosis

Don’t declare, “Oh, cancer’s no big deal. My mom has had that for 20 years and is doing fine.” Remember that I’m not your mom and that any cancer is a serious issue. Even skin cancer, bladder cancer and other “minor” malignancies kill people every day. They cause suffering. They cause organ removal and disfigurement and fear and shame. I hate when people try to deny this fact or to minimize it by giving me false reassurance or by saying that I’m going to fine. The truth is I don’t know I’m going to be fine, you don’t know I’m going to be fine, even my oncologist doesn’t know what my outcome will be. Instead, I feel comforted by phrases like “I believe in you.” or “I’m pulling for you.”

 

Don’t be Judgmental or Ask for a Health History

For many cancer patients there’s nothing worse than being sick and getting advice from the healthy, because it’s almost like insinuating we did something to make this happen to us. It may be true in some cases that our lifestyle or health care choices increase the odds of getting cancer or contribute to cancer progression. However, if you cause someone with cancer to absorb blame and feel shame it will almost certainly make matters worse. Shame and guilt are unnecessary burdens to carry. From everything that’s known about the emotions and health, acceptance and forgiveness are what cancer patients need to cultivate and enhance healing, not self-condemnation or self-blame.

1 Comment

Filed under cancer psychological impact

Finding the Resilience to Face a New Year

This is the sixth New Year that I’ve celebrated since my cancer diagnosis, and each one brings with it a mixture of hope, fear and uncertainty. For many cancer survivors watching everyone plan for the future is difficult, it can produce mixed emotions and make the dawn of a new year extremely challenging.

That’s why I’m not going to use this blog to give a lecture about New Year’s resolutions or to suggest that you make elaborate promises to yourself. I realize that living with cancer often renders such gestures trivial and that your life is probably being planned week-by-week or month-by-month. Instead I’ve chosen to share some of my favourite quotations about resilience.

I hope the meditations that I’ve selected make the beginning of another year a little less daunting for you and provide you with strength and inspiration for your cancer journey. As someone once said, life doesn’t get easier or more forgiving, but we can choose to get stronger and more resilient.

resilience-1

 

“Resilience is accepting your new reality, even if it’s less good than the one you had before. You can fight it, you can do nothing but scream about what you’ve lost, or you can accept that and try to put together something that’s good.”

— Elizabeth Edwards

 

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.

— Maya Angelou

 

“My scars remind me that I did indeed survive my deepest wounds. That in itself is an accomplishment. And they bring to mind something else, too. They remind me that the damage life has inflicted on me has, in many places, left me stronger and more resilient. What hurt me in the past has actually made me better equipped to face the present.”

— Steve Goodier

 

“You all know that I have been sustained throughout my life by three saving graces—my family, my friends and a faith in the power of resilience and hope. These graces have carried me through difficult times and they have brought more joy to the good times than I ever could have imagined.”

— Elizabeth Edwards

 

“Those who make us believe that anything’s possible and fire our imagination over the long haul, are often the ones who have survived the bleakest of circumstances. The men and women who have every reason to despair, but don’t, may have the most to teach us, not only about how to hold true to our beliefs, but about how such a life can bring about seemingly impossible social change.”

— Paul Rogat Loeb

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

10 Things I Wish I Had Done Before I Was Diagnosed With Cancer

I’m convinced that nothing can fully prepare a person for the impact of a cancer diagnosis, but there are still things that I wish I had done before cancer became a part of my life. As a five-year cancer survivor I now have the wisdom of hindsight, so I’ve chosen to share my definitive list of what I wish I had accomplished when I was still healthy.

to-do-list

Have a Plan Regarding My Work and Income

It’s important to have a strategy in the event that you suddenly become unable to work due to illness or disability. Unfortunately I was unprepared and learned this lesson the hard way. If you’re a self-employed individual, such as a freelancer or independent contractor, you may be especially vulnerable if circumstances ever render you unable to work for the long-term.

Go Out and Experience New Things

When I was still in good health, I made too many excuses about why I couldn’t go out to events or experience new things. I’m basically an introvert and prefer to stay in, it’s for couples only, I can’t afford it, the transportation and commute are too much of a hassle were some of the issues I’d focus on when ruling out gatherings or events.

Be More Physically Active

I regret not going for long walks or spending more time outdoors in the years leading up to my cancer diagnosis. Science has essentially proven that people who are active have an advantage compared to those who don’t exercise. Active individuals tend to live longer, healthier lives than their sedentary counterparts.

Purchase a Disability Insurance Plan

This is something I really regret not taking care of and I strongly urge anyone without this type of insurance to look into a plan. The only alternative to private insurance if you suddenly become chronically ill or disabled is most often government assistance.

Listen to My Body

Ovarian cancer is sometimes called the “silent killer” because its symptoms are often subtle or mimic other less serious illnesses. It’s important to know what is normal for your body and to be alert to any changes that might indicate a problem. I wish I had been more in tune with my body and more persistent with my doctors.

Develop a Support Network

When I was diagnosed with cancer I quickly realized that my social support network is very small. Specifically, I’m single, come from a small family of origin and have few close friends. I understand that some of this isn’t under my control, but I definitely wish I had been more diligent about building a network when I was still healthy.

Pay More Attention to My Relationships

If you have conflicts in your family relationships or have simply drifted apart, I suggest you reach out to repair whatever damage might have occurred over the years. Once you are diagnosed with a chronic illness you suddenly comprehend the value of having strong bonds with family members, including your parents, spouse, siblings and children.

Be Prepared For People’s Reactions

When people learned of my cancer diagnosis their reactions sometimes caused me resentment, frustration or anger. They meant well, but I could have been more prepared for their sometimes inappropriate remarks and gestures. Many individuals are misinformed about the scientific facts surrounding cancer or don’t know how to properly reach out to a friend who has been diagnosed with the disease.

Catch Up on Things I’d Let Slide

We all have a tendency to procrastinate or push tasks and projects to the back burner. When I became ill I suddenly realized how many things were left undone and how many loose ends I should have tied up. If you have been meaning to buy some essential new pieces for your wardrobe, need new glasses or need to get your car or computer serviced, do it now!

Establish an Outlet For Anger and Grief

The universal emotions for nearly all cancer patients are anger and grief—intense anger that can border on rage and a grief that can feel like a bottomless well of despair. To maintain your emotional health you’ll need an outlet for these feelings. It might be a friend, therapist or support group, but it’s important to have someone that you can confide in without fear of judgment

 

Leave a comment

Filed under cancer financial impact, cancer psychological impact

Five-Year Survivor: On Reaching Another Cancer Milestone

timepiece

In just a few weeks I’ll face an emotional and bittersweet milestone, the fifth anniversary of my cancer diagnosis. Above all I’m grateful that I made it through the grueling medical treatments that I had in 2011 and 2012. There were moments when I felt so sick and physically weak from surgery or chemotherapy that I was afraid I might die. I thank God for my oncology team; they were always there and never stopped encouraging me. It turns out they were right to be optimistic about my prognosis, or at least to be confident that I could achieve remission. I’ve been in remission from ovarian cancer, a disease that many refer to as the silent killer of women, for four years now.

As my cancer anniversary approaches, I’ve been thinking a great deal about how much things have changed for me. Personally, I’ve discovered that physical attractiveness, material possessions and social status all matter less to me now. These things frequently seem to fade into irrelevance as I confront a life-threatening illness. Meanwhile, my relationships with other people, discovering ways that I can make a difference in the world and learning more about the essence of who I am are currently at the forefront of my agenda and have an extremely high priority to me.  Most of all, I’m aware of time and of the immeasurable value of each day that I’m alive. Here are some powerful meditations that I though I would share.

“I ask you to imagine that there is a bank account that credits your account each morning with $86,400. It carries over no balance from day to day. Every evening the bank deletes whatever part of the balance you failed to use during the day. What would you do? Draw out every cent, of course.

Each of us has such a bank, its name is time. Every morning, it credits you 86,400 seconds. Every night it writes off at a loss, whatever of this you failed to invest to a good purpose. It carries over no balance. It allows no overdraft. Each day it opens a new account for you. Each night it burns the remains of the day. If you fail to use the day’s deposits, the loss is yours.

There is no drawing against “tomorrow.” You must live in the present on today’s deposits. Invest it so as to get from it the utmost in happiness and health. The clock is running. Make the most of today.”

 — Marc Levy, French novelist

“It’s being here now that’s important. There’s no past and there’s no future. Time is a very misleading thing. All there is ever is the now. We can gain experience from the past, but we can’t relive it; and we can hope for the future, but we don’t know if there is one.”

― George Harrison

“You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. Fools stand on their island of opportunities and look toward another land. There is no other land; there is no other life but this.”

— Henry David Thoreau

 

dead-poets-society1

In the film Dead Poets Society Robin Williams plays an unconventional English teacher named John Keating. In one of the movie’s most memorable scenes the teacher stands with his students gazing at some vintage school portraits. As they view the photographs of previous generations, this is what Keating tells the group of young men in his class:

“They’re not that different from you, are they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones,  just like you. Invincible,  just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they’re destined for great things,  just like many of you, their eyes are full of hope,  just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because, you see gentlemen, these boys are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in. Listen, you hear it?   Carpe   hear it?   Carpe, carpe diem, seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.”

Leave a comment

Filed under cancer psychological impact

Hospitals: Are They Still Places for the Sick to Get Well?

I suppose I’m incredibly lucky, having never been admitted to a hospital as an overnight patient until a few years ago. Inevitably like many cancer survivors I’ve undergone an unhappy transformation, I’ve been transformed from a hospital newbie into an experienced pro. Now that I’ve completed active treatment for ovarian and uterine cancer, I can boast approximately 70 days of my life spent looking at the world from a hospital bed. It’s no wonder that I was almost brought to tears recently while reading an article by André Picard, the Globe and Mail’s public health reporter. Picard nailed it perfectly in his recent article Taking patient-centred health care from rhetoric to reality.

“So, what do patients dislike about being in the health system – aside from being sick, of course? A number of things: the helplessness; the feeling of anonymity; the discontinuity of care; the rote and the repetition; being talked about and talked to, rather than talked with; the waiting; and the loneliness.”

This epitomizes my experience as a cancer patient in so many ways and it also hints at what I believe are the limitations of most Canadian hospitals.

 

What Hospitals Are Not

During my cancer surgeries I often felt an urgent need to leave the hospital and go home, I never felt relaxed or like I could take my time to heal. These days, it may be easier to define hospitals by what they are not. They are not places for the sick to get well, not unless healing takes place in the brief interval of time that makes the stay a compensated expense. My hospital treatment was primarily covered by Alberta’s universal health insurance, but I needed my personal Blue Cross insurance plan as well. Through it all I was aware that hospital beds in Alberta cost around $1000 per day and that those beds are in limited supply.

I watched as some short-term stay patients were relegated to the hallway due to the unavailability of rooms. It was a reminder of how drastically the situation for patients and their families has changed in the past couple of decades. Once hospitals were where you stayed when you were too sick to survive at home; now you go home anyway, cobbling together your own nursing services from friends, relatives and drop-in professionals.

Foothills_Hosp

The Foothills Hospital in Calgary is one of Canada’s largest medical facilities.

 

Turn Down the Noise

Like overcrowding the noise level in most hospitals has grown considerably worse over the past several decades. Dr. Brian Goldman recently discussed this topic in a blog post titled Hospitals bring down ‘da noise. Since 1960, the average daytime noise level in hospitals has gone up 200 per cent. Over the same period, the noise level at night has gone up 400 per cent. The World Health Organization says that for optimal health, the noise level in a patient’s room should be no higher than 35 decibels during the day, and 30 decibels at night. That’s the level of quiet conversation. In spite of these guidelines a 2012 study by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital found that the noise level on one unit averaged 76 decibels, that’s the noise level of a vacuum cleaner.

My personal experience gives an even more graphic example. At one point I had the misfortune of being hospitalized during some construction on the gynecologic oncology unit. Many staff members were apologetic and upset by the constant racket that we all had to endure. There were times when it sounded like a jackhammer and the noise levels had to be over 100 decibels. I believe that these circumstances were detrimental to my health and curtailed my ability to rest or heal properly. Actually, several studies have confirmed that excessive noise or disturbed sleep affects the immune system and delays recovery from major surgery.

 

Hello My Name Is

The medical professionals that I’ve encountered have all been competent, but what is often lacking is a sense that I’m a unique human being and not just a numbered chart or an illness to be discussed. British doctor Kate Granger recently passed away from cancer, but before she died she drew global attention to the impersonal care that patients in hospitals often receive. When Granger entered the hospital, her greatest anguish came from the fact that she was not treated as a person, but as an object on which tasks were performed. “I just couldn’t believe the impersonal nature of care, and how people seemed to be hiding behind their anonymity,” she recalled. Dr. Granger noted that, when people introduced themselves, it was comforting and made her feel safer and more like a person than an illness.

kate_Granger

Dr. Kate Granger left an important legacy.

While facing her own terminal cancer, Granger launched a spontaneous “Hello my name is” campaign urging health professionals to introduce themselves to patients. More than 400,000 staffers with the National Health Service in England have embraced the philosophy, and there are offshoots in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, the United States and Canada. Meanwhile the campaign is still gaining momentum on social media, the hashtag #hellomynameis has been used more than one billion times.

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under cancer doctor-patient relationship, cancer psychological impact

Because it’s 2016: A New Era for Cancer Patients

Few doctors in this country seem to be involved with the non-life-threatening side effects of cancer therapy. In the United States, baldness, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, clogged veins, financial problems, broken marriages, disturbed children, loss of libido, loss of self-esteem, and body image are nurses’ turf.

Rose Kushner

One of the most stunning realizations that I’ve had since being diagnosed with cancer is how much cancer impacts the whole person—the disease can undermine almost every aspect of a person’s life. The field of oncology acknowledges this, at least more than it did four decades ago when American journalist Rose Kushner spoke these words. Today most cancer patients, including myself, have access to social workers, psychologists, dieticians and other skilled professionals. Treating the whole person and recognizing that each patient has unique issues and needs have become firmly entrenched and are part of the philosophy of cancer care.

At my cancer centre there are now two forms that patients are asked to fill out at every checkup. The first contains questions to gage a patient’s physical wellbeing as they go thorough treatment, but a second questionnaire was recently added. This latest form is used to gather information about the various psychosocial issues that are associated with cancer. Certain social, financial or mental health issues may need to be addressed. While I sometimes resent having to answer what I consider highly personal questions, I realize the importance of asking cancer patients about almost every aspect of their lives.

 

Research Breakthroughs

 

immunotherapy two

Dr. Barbara Vanderhyden, one of Canada’s preeminent ovarian cancer researchers, recalls that when she began her work she was one of the only people in Canada researching the disease. Over a decade ago Vanderhyden started the Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research and now the community has grown from three people to more than 60 ovarian cancer researchers across the country. This flourishing research community has led to a number of recent discoveries. For instance, it is now known that ovarian cancer is not one disease but a spectrum of diseases with different responses to treatment.

I’m frequently amazed at the lightening speed at which new cancer treatments are being discovered and implemented. For example, immunotherapy is an emerging approach to treatment that boosts the immune response to cancer. It enables the body to target and destroy cancer cells. There are three main areas of immunotherapy that are showing promise.

  • Vaccines that enhance immune system response
  • Inhibitors that affect how the immune system regulates itself
  • Adoptive T-cell transfer, which removes a patient’s cancer-fighting T-cells and activates them before returning them to the bloodstream

Although gynecological cancers, such as mine, have seen only modest breakthroughs in immunotherapy, melanoma and lung cancer are areas that are witnessing great progress.

 

New Targeted Treatments

 

Immunotherapy one

According to many scientists a new era of cancer treatment is beginning in which patients get drugs matched specifically to their tumour. Patients experience longer survival and fewer toxic effects through this approach, which is being made possible by advances in genetic profiling of the tumour itself. Conventional chemotherapy and radiation treatments have both short-term and long-term side effects and can be absolutely brutal for patients to endure. These treatments kill a significant number of healthy cells in addition to the cancer cells. “At the moment it’s more like using a cannonball to kill an ant – and creating a whole lot of damage at the same time,” explains professor Roy Herbst, chief of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Centre.

Meanwhile a UK trial, called Optima, is being run by University College London and Cambridge University and funded by Cancer Research UK. Beginning this summer, it will recruit 4,500 women with breast cancer. The women’s tumours will be genetically tested as soon as they are diagnosed to establish which will respond to chemotherapy and which will not. Of the 50,000 or so women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK each year, about 40 per cent, or 20,000, are currently given chemotherapy but only half of them do well as a result of it; in the other half, the benefit is unclear. The researchers hope to find out which of the latter group actually need chemotherapy. As one oncologist emphasized: “In some ways it is simple – it means that you can make sure you are giving the right drug to the right person at the right time. In others it is very complex, because there are so many pieces to the jigsaw. We need to put the puzzle together.”

1 Comment

Filed under cancer research