Crushing the Third Wave

It’s around lunchtime on a windy spring day as I walk into the building and begin navigating the checkpoints that have been setup for the COVID vaccination clinic. As I make my way to the old gymnasium in the former children’s hospital, I’m relieved that I have managed to book an appointment—after several months of waiting it’s finally my demographic’s chance. Like hundreds of thousands, I had to first wait in anticipation while following the latest updates from the Alberta government concerning a complex vaccine rollout plan. 

I’m intensely aware as I’m about to be vaccinated, that our province has one of North America’s highest COVID-19 rates. Of course, it’s a dubious distinction and our third wave outbreak has garnered international attention in the media. In recent weeks American. television networks such as CNN have covered it and so has the venerable British newspaper The Guardian. As a cancer survivor and someone who is potentially vulnerable to complications from the virus, I’ve become extremely angry and frustrated.

Many physicians and leading public health experts have argued that it didn’t have to become this bad and that Albertans shouldn’t have to go through this nightmare. The third wave has been terrifying, especially for those of us who are not young or perfectly healthy, On the day that I’m ready to receive my first dose of Pfizer vaccine, Alberta has around 570 active cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 residents, more than twice the Canadian average. It’s the highest rate recorded anywhere in Canada at any point during the pandemic.

Regrettably, the province is now mired in its third major round of restrictions since the pandemic began last March. The latest surge has forced the reintroduction of strict, sweeping public health measures, closing all schools provincewide and temporarily shuttering many non-essential businesses. Most experts are citing a variety of contributing factors to explain exactly how we got into this situation or why Alberta’s third wave has become so severe. Here is their general consensus of what went wrong:

  • A premature easing of public health restrictions
  • An underestimation of COVID-19 variants 
  • An inequitable vaccine rollout
  • Non-compliance and non-enforcement regarding health restrictions
  • Refusing to prioritize the province’s schools and teachers

For the time being, I’ve joined a steady stream of hopeful Calgarians at the vaccination centre. There is light at the end of the tunnel I tell myself as I enter the gym and a woman takes my registration confirmation number and asks for my ID. Suddenly, I’m not just thinking about myself or my immediate geographic region, but the entire world. I wonder how many people will also get vaccinated today—both in Canada and around the globe. I believe in science and I understand mass vaccination will be one of the keys to ending this unprecedented pandemic that has claimed millions of lives.

Naturally there are segments of the population that are hesitant or sceptical about the new COVID-19 vaccines and are unsure if they should be immunized. History reveals that vaccine scepticism is as old as vaccines themselves. Increased resistance to compulsory smallpox vaccination during the 1870s and 1880s exposed the fragility of trust in both the political and medical establishment. The most radical opponents to vaccines used demonstrations and publishing to rally their cause. The situation is similar today, many doctors and infectious disease experts acknowledge that their work has been made more challenging due to the anti-vaccine movement. 

As I meet the diligent young nurse who is about to administer my injection, I know I trust both her and the medical and scientific community. Perhaps it’s my experience as a cancer survivor that allows that trust to come more easily. Sometimes I marvel that I’m alive because of medical science and what it’s capable of in the fight against cancer, during the search for a COVID-19 vaccine my sense of wonder was renewed. Never before in human history have vaccines for a pathogen entered final stage clinical trials and received approval for distribution to the public so rapidly. To me this doesn’t mean they cut corners or that proper clinical trials weren’t conducted it’s only a testament to what the scientific community can accomplish when it works together toward one crucial goal.

Following my shot, I get up and move to the waiting area full of masked and freshly immunized patients. As a routine precaution people are asked to wait for at least fifteen minutes after their injection before leaving the vaccination centre. As I sit in my socially distanced chair, I think to myself that I will probably remember this moment for the rest of my life. Someone said that the stories you hold on to about the pandemic will be colored by your own experience—but also by the experiences of those around you. In a way we’re already shaping our future pandemic narratives—the stories we will tell as individuals, as communities, as societies, and as nations about this epoch. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s