Information Please

The moment I was diagnosed with cancer I entered a psychological realm where wanting to know everything about the disease alternated with fear and aversion. I realized it was solemn news when a week after my hysterectomy the phone range and my surgeon wanted to see me immediately. As I sat in my gynecologist’s office on that autumn afternoon, he was thoughtful enough to provide me with my own copy of the surgical pathology report, a crucial document outlining the specifics of my uterine and ovarian cancer. He estimated that it would be a couple of weeks before I could have a consultation with a team of oncologists at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre. In the coming days I developed a love-hate relationship with the information that I had been given. Numb and in shock, I read over the three-page report repeatedly, meticulously researching the strange and frightening medical terminology.

I read the words endometroid adenocarcinoma for the first time, I didn’t comprehend until much later that I had learned my enemy’s name. Derived from the words “adeno” meaning pertaining to a gland and “carcinoma” meaning a cancerous tumour, the disease is a formidable adversary. One organ that is commonly affected includes the lining of the uterus, or endometrium. Adenocarcinoma is even more frequently diagnosed in the colon or the lungs. My surgical pathology report contained many confusing and ominous terms. I never thought of my reproductive organs as a possible death sentence, but that’s what the report seemed to be implicating. References to yellowish tan neoplasm and a uterine tumour measuring 11 centimetres at its greatest dimension both sickened and terrified me! At another point I started to pity my tiny right ovary. To make the personification complete, I’m sure she fought a valiant battle, but she was strangled by a separate tumour of about 7 centimetres.

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I’ve come a long way since I first read that menacing pathology report nearly a year and a half ago. My ability to deal with medical information and to collaborate with my health care team has improved since then. Today, I offer the following advice to cancer patients and their caregivers. In a broader sense these recommendations could probably apply to anyone facing a serious health crisis.

Knowledge is Power

You are the most important member of your cancer care team and it’s essential to actively participate in your care. Pay close attention throughout the process of your care and participate fully in discussions with your oncologist and other medical specialists. Don’t hesitate to raise any concerns with your oncologist or with other appropriate health care professionals on your cancer team. If something doesn’t seem right or you sense that certain issues aren’t being addressed speak up!

Find the Right Balance

Never in my life have I felt so simultaneously overwhelmed by an abundance of medial information and frustrated by a lack of it. This ambiguity of emotions is understandable in cancer patients as they undergo treatment for some of the most complex and difficult to understand diseases within the realm of medical science. Personally, I’ve discovered that tension and anxiety occur unless a balance of information about my cancer is achieved (not too much and not too little). In my opinion, this ideal equilibrium will vary. It also depends largely on an individual’s psychological makeup and is more often than not impossible to maintain constantly.

Use Only Reliable Sources

Simply explained, every cell in the body has a tightly regulated system that dictates when it needs to grow, mature and eventually die off. Cancer occurs when cells lose this control and divide and proliferate indiscriminately. Theories, treatments and possible explanations for cancer are abundant. They range from the factual or medically proven to the bizarre, absurd and downright dangerous. Regrettably there are a few contemptible individuals who knowingly try to profit from cancer patients or exploit our unique physical, emotional and psychological needs. I appreciate that the most specific and reliable information comes from my oncologist and the related medical professionals on my cancer care team. When I access printed materials or the abundance of online resources that are available, I am highly selective. I’d like to conclude this post by listing a few prominent organizations that I recommend.

The Canadian Cancer Society   http://www.cancer.ca

The American Cancer Society   http://www.cancer.org

CancerNet  http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/uterine-cancer

 Ovarian Cancer Canada   http://www.ovariancanada.org

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